Friday November 27, 2015


Cobia, Ling, Crab Eater, Lemon Fish

Cobia are hard fighting, heavy fish that never seem to give up the battle even after they're boated. Average size of this fish seems to be over 25 lbs with 35-40 lbs not uncommon. Brown to black colored with no teeth, short spikes on their backs and plenty of "BIG FISH" attitude. Cobia are often mistaken by anglers for sharks and can be seen freely swimming near the surface near flotsam or structure. For the most part cobia are dark brown but can have some color fluctuation due to genetics or habitat.

Both INSHORE and NEARSHORE inhabiting inlets, bays, and among mangroves; frequently seen around buoys, pilings, and wrecks. During the spring and fall migrations they can often be seen free swimming along the coastline.

We often find cobia swimming near the surface near floating sargassum seaweed or flotsam. Prior to the 1980's cobia would frequent navigation aids but this has become less of a habit due to angling pressure.

One of the preferred ways to catch cobia consistently is to simply bottom fish near wrecks and structure. Cobia respond well to live bait and find comfort and food source near large bottom structure.

As a note you should always look around large marinelife for swimming cobia. Large sharks, manta rays, whales and turtles can often hold cobia that relate to them as traveling companions or hitchhikers.


spawns in spring and early summer; feeds on crabs, squid, and small fish. Target this fish in early spring or late winter (feb-april). Cobia are often seasonal so make your reservations during this time of year.

Cobia Fishing Information & Photos

Port Canaveral Cobia
Family Cobia Fishing
Cobia with Manta Rays
Offshore Cobia
Schooling Cobia Offshore
Site Fishing Cobia
Inshore Cobia Fishing
Central Florida Cobia
Cobia Captain Charters
Cobia Fishing


Minimum size 33" to fork 1 per harvester or 6 per vessel per day, whichever is less.

State Record

103 lbs., 12 ozs.

Published by: Captain of Lagooner Fishing Guides© on

More Cobia Information

Redfish Fishing Charters

Cobia or Ling are considered one of Florida's top inshore and offshore gamefish. They are not only exciting to catch but they can demonstrate power that many fish are just not capable of. Most Cobia or ling are caught offhshore around wrecks, floatsome, structure but can often be seen freeswimming during their yearly migration to and from their summer grounds. Depending upon whether you fish in the Gulf or on the Atlantic side of Florida, the cobia fishing varies slightly but the results are tremendous. Cobia can be caught by sightfishing, trolling or bottom fishing, they're truly one of the best gamefish in America.

Fill Out Form for Charter Fishing Information

Request information about a fishing trip with a Lagooner Fishing Guide by filling out and submitting this form or simply calling (321) 868-4953

Fishing Reports

November - 2015 Fishing Report

The Banana River has had some spectacular days during October of 2015 and heading into November we are already plucking some nice sized trout in the shallow waters off Cocoa Beach and Merritt Island. Look for redfish and sea trout to improve as the temperatures continue to cool and the deeper dropoffs to provide plenty of action. Most of the fish during this month have been caught on rocky out-croppings or shallow water estuaries along the edges of islands and shorelines. Basically if you find good amounts of bait, you will find the fish

Fishing Forecast

November - 2015 Fishing Forecast

Thanksgiving in Central Florida and on the Banana River Lagoon can be a great time of the year for almost all types of inshore species native to our area. Redfish, black drum and sea trout will really kick in as the month matures and will only get better as the winter deepens. Look for this fall month to produce good numbers of redfish and some spotted sea trout. If it's a very cool month, it should be better and warmer will still produce well. The nice thing about November too is that there is less fishing pressure and boaters on the lagoon. This will help with the gathering of fish in the busier parts of the lagoon and it's also a good time to have some seclusion.

Florida Saltwater Gamefish

Redfish, Red Drum, Puppy Drum, Channel Bass

Common Snook, Swordspine Snook, Black Snook, Fat Snook, Robalo

Cobia, Ling, Crab Eater, Lemon Fish

Black Drum, Drum Fish, Drum

Spotted Seatrout, Sea Trout, Speckled Trout, Gator Trout

Tarpon, Sabalo, Silver King

Lady Fish, Poor Man's Tarpon

Blue Fish, Bluefish

Crevalle Jack, Jack Fish

Dolphin, Mahi Mahi, Dorado

King Mackerel, King Fish, Kingfish, Mackerel

Spanish Mackerel

Tripletail, Triple Tail, Bouy Bass

Cubera Snapper, Snapper

Mangrove Snapper

Amber Jack

Gag Grouper, Grey Grouper

Red Snapper, American Red Snapper

Sailfish, Sail Fish

Goliath Grouper or Jewfish