Lady Fish

Saturday November 28, 2015

Lady Fish

Lady Fish, Poor Man's Tarpon

Lady fish are cousins to the larger (much larger) tarpon. They have some similarities to the tarpon but less exagerated and smaller. I'm not sure what a terminal mouth means but the Florida Wildlife Commission biologist says they have one. Ladyfish have a slender body with small scales that come off very easily when boated. Their last dorsal ray is slightly elongated on a single dorsal. Ladyfish have a small pointed head and no teeth, but are feisty fighters and readily take artificial lures and baits.

INSHORE fish, in bays and estuaries; occasionally enters freshwater, occurring in tidal pools and canals; often forms large schools and harasses bait at the surface. We find ladyfish are abundant almost everywhere we fish from Ft Pierce Inlet to Mosquito Lagoon grass flats and dropoffs. You'll often find them in large schools in the middle of the lagoon feeding on glass minnows and other small finfish.


Ladyfish spawn offshore and are a great species to target for fun. Kids love to catch and watch these beautiful and easily targeted fish.

Once hooked, these fish stay in the air more than the water. Cousin to the larger tarpon, ladyfish are pound for pound as skillful and aerobatic fighter as the silver king. While ladyfish are not as sought out as the larger tarpon they can be a pleasant surprise for an angler when fishing is slow. Try ladyfish on small fly casting equipment or ultra-light spinning tackle, you won't regret this awesome Florida gamefish

Ladyfish Tip: Look for diving birds and splashing fish on the surface and you'll often find ladyfish schooling in the Indian River Lagoon. Ladyfish chunks make awesome baits for other species as they produce a wonderfully fishy aroma that triggers feeding in many Florida gamefish.


No limit or size regulation.

State Record

4 lbs., 10 ozs.

Published by: Captain of Lagooner Fishing Guides© on

More Lady Fish Information

ladyfish Fishing Charters

Lady Fish are not nearly as presigious as their cousin the tarpon but they are tarpon wanna-be's. Once hooked ladyfish immediatly exit the water and head for the sky in multilple jumping succession. Ladyfish can bring with them screams of laughter and bliss as youthful anglers never seem to tire of hooking up and letting their guide unhook these slimmy fish from their rods and reels. Often leaving trails of boogers from their slime on everyone's clothing and boats, ladyfish can leave memories of a great day of fishing when cleaning both laundry and equipment at the end of the day. Don't shy away from the lady fish when they're around. ladies are a great catch when you want some action!

Fill Out Form for Charter Fishing Information

Request information about a fishing trip with a Lagooner Fishing Guide by filling out and submitting this form or simply calling (321) 868-4953

Fishing Reports

November - 2015 Fishing Report

The Banana River has had some spectacular days during October of 2015 and heading into November we are already plucking some nice sized trout in the shallow waters off Cocoa Beach and Merritt Island. Look for redfish and sea trout to improve as the temperatures continue to cool and the deeper dropoffs to provide plenty of action. Most of the fish during this month have been caught on rocky out-croppings or shallow water estuaries along the edges of islands and shorelines. Basically if you find good amounts of bait, you will find the fish

Fishing Forecast

November - 2015 Fishing Forecast

Thanksgiving in Central Florida and on the Banana River Lagoon can be a great time of the year for almost all types of inshore species native to our area. Redfish, black drum and sea trout will really kick in as the month matures and will only get better as the winter deepens. Look for this fall month to produce good numbers of redfish and some spotted sea trout. If it's a very cool month, it should be better and warmer will still produce well. The nice thing about November too is that there is less fishing pressure and boaters on the lagoon. This will help with the gathering of fish in the busier parts of the lagoon and it's also a good time to have some seclusion.

Florida Saltwater Gamefish

Redfish, Red Drum, Puppy Drum, Channel Bass

Common Snook, Swordspine Snook, Black Snook, Fat Snook, Robalo

Cobia, Ling, Crab Eater, Lemon Fish

Black Drum, Drum Fish, Drum

Spotted Seatrout, Sea Trout, Speckled Trout, Gator Trout

Tarpon, Sabalo, Silver King

Lady Fish, Poor Man's Tarpon

Blue Fish, Bluefish

Crevalle Jack, Jack Fish

Dolphin, Mahi Mahi, Dorado

King Mackerel, King Fish, Kingfish, Mackerel

Spanish Mackerel

Tripletail, Triple Tail, Bouy Bass

Cubera Snapper, Snapper

Mangrove Snapper

Amber Jack

Gag Grouper, Grey Grouper

Red Snapper, American Red Snapper

Sailfish, Sail Fish

Goliath Grouper or Jewfish